A VIDEO

beautifulmars:

The Velocity of Martian Ethereality from UAHiRISE on Vimeo.

HiClip Classic from 20 May 2009. (Music by HiRISE).

Reblogueado desde BEAUTIFUL MARS
A PHOTO

spaceexp:

Spiral Galaxy NGC 1232 - The central region contains older stars of a reddish color, while the spiral arms are populated by young, blue stars and star-forming regions.

Reblogueado desde Exploring Space
A VIDEO

prettylxxxve:

lifehackable:

Stretches that improve different aspects of your body.

Much needed thanks

A PHOTO

spaceexp:

Jupiter Eclipsing its moon, Ganymede

Reblogueado desde Exploring Space
A PHOTO

distant-traveller:

Fresh tiger stripes on Saturn’s Enceladus

Do underground oceans vent through the tiger stripes on Saturn’s moon Enceladus? Long features dubbed tiger stripes are known to be spewing ice from the moon’s icy interior into space, creating a cloud of fine ice particles over the moon’s South Pole and creating Saturn’s mysterious E-ring. Evidence for this has come from the robot Cassini spacecraft now orbiting Saturn. Pictured above, a high resolution image of Enceladus is shown from a close flyby. The unusual surface features dubbed tiger stripes are visible in false-color blue. Why Enceladus is active remains a mystery, as the neighboring moon Mimas, approximately the same size, appears quite dead. Most recently, an analysis of slight gravity deviations has given an independent indication of underground oceans. Such research is particularly interesting since such oceans would be candidates to contain life.

Image credit: Cassini Imaging Team, SSI, JPL, ESA, NASA

Reblogueado desde Voyage into Space
A PHOTO

spaceplasma:

Suppose you had a single hydrogen atom and at a particular instant plotted the position of its electron. Soon afterwards, you do the same thing, and find that it is in a new position. You have no idea how it got from the first place to the second. You keep on doing this over and over again, and gradually build up a sort of 3D map of the places that the electron is likely to be found.

The Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle  says - loosely - that you can’t know with certainty both where an electron is and where it’s going next. That makes it impossible to plot an orbit for an electron around a nucleus, but we have a mathematical function that describes the wave-like behavior of either one electron or a pair of electrons in an atom. This function can be used to calculate the probability of finding any electron of an atom in any specific region around the atom’s nucleus.

In the hydrogen case, the electron can be found anywhere within a spherical space surrounding the nucleus. Such a region of space is called an orbital. Orbits and orbitals sound similar, but they have quite different meanings. It is essential that you understand the difference between them. You can think of an orbital as being the region of space in which the electron lives. The GIF animation shows the probability densities for the electron of a hydrogen atom in different quantum states. These orbitals form an orthonormal basis for the wave function of the electron. These shapes are intended to describe the angular forms of regions in space where the electrons occupying the orbital are likely to be found.

A VIDEO

mucholderthen:

Incredible view of Antarctica with sea ice at its maximum, in the month of September [on September 21, 2005], made from the data taken by the AMSR-E instrument, a device designed to capture temperatures and sea ice concentration onboard NASA’s Aqua satellite.

(source)

Reblogueado desde Super Nerdy Stoner
A VIDEO

max-peck:

This is 35 seconds of Neil deGrasse Tyson dancing or: The greatest 35 seconds of your entire life.

Reblogueado desde CWL