A PHOTO

thedragoninmygarage:

THE THREE LAYER CAKE

There are thousands upon thousands of layers in the earth’s crust. However, scientists have grouped the layers into major groups. The most recent three layers are the Paleozoic, Mesozoic, and Cenozoic. These layers represent the last 500 million years of life on earth.

In the Paleozoic, you find fish, amphibian, and reptile fossils (in that order), but never dinosaurs, birds, modern mammals, or even flowering plants.

Think of that: despite the billions of plant fossils in the Paleozoic layer, nobody has ever found one fossil of a flower, including any kind of deciduous tree or even a single blade of grass. Why not? The obvious explaination is flowers had not evolved yet.

The next layer, the Mesozoic, is often called the age of dinosaurs. The Mesozoic has dinosaurs like crazy. Of course, dinosaurs are reptiles and that’s why you won’t find any until after the Paleozoic which contains the first reptiles. The Mesozoic also has the first flowering plants, birds, and mammals, though few if any birds or mammals that we know of today.

On top of the Paleozoic and Mesozoic is the Cenozoic. This is the current layer that is still being deposited in oceans, deserts and swamps all around the earth today. The Cenozoic is the first major layer where we find modern mammal fossils like cats, dogs, monkeys and humans. This layer, or “era” is often referred to as the age of mammals.

These three layers make up a sort of 3-layer cake. Just like a cake, the bottom layer went down first, followed by the middle and the top. Since fossils progress from fish at the bottom to humans at the top, we have clear evidence that life evolved through time.

Credit: prehistoricplanet.com

Reblogueado desde Storm Bear Williams
A VIDEO
Reblogueado desde Que vida mas triste...
A VIDEO

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Earth is not the only planet in our solar system with auroras. As the solar wind—a stream of rarefied plasma from our sun—blows through the solar system, it interacts with the magnetic fields of other planets as well as our own. Saturn’s magnetic field second only to Jupiter’s in strength. This strong magnetosphere deflects many of the solar wind’s energetic particles, but, as on Earth, some of the particles get drawn in along Saturn’s magnetic field lines. These lines converge at the poles, where the high-energy particles interact with the gases in the upper reaches of Saturn’s atmosphere. As a result, Saturn, like Earth, has impressive and colorful light displays around its poles. (Image credit: ESA/Hubble, M. Kornmesser & L. Calçada, source video; via spaceplasma)

Reblogueado desde Storm Bear Williams
A PHOTO
Reblogueado desde Follamos con Gordas
A PHOTO

spaceexp:

close up of a rock on Churyumov-Gerasimenko

Reblogueado desde Exploring Space
A VIDEO

beautifulmars:

Light-Toned Deposits Exposed along the Floor of a Terra Sabaea Crater

Reblogueado desde BEAUTIFUL MARS
A VIDEO
Reblogueado desde i can't even
A VIDEO

astronomyandastrophotography:

gamma—crucis:

The Crab Nebula is a supernova remnant and pulsar wind nebula found in the constellation of Taurus. At it’s center lies a neutron star 28-30km across, that emits radiation from gamma rays to radio waves. It is not visible to the naked eye, but can be seen using a telescope or binoculars.

Image Credit: NASA, ESA, ESO

Reblogueado desde Voyage into Space
A PHOTO
Reblogueado desde i can't even
A PHOTO

travelandseetheworld:

Polar Bear and Northern Lights

Travel and see the world

Reblogueado desde Travel and See the World
A PHOTO

distant-traveller:

Stuck on the rings

Like a drop of dew hanging on a leaf, Tethys appears to be stuck to the A and F rings from this perspective.

Tethys (660 miles, or 1,062 kilometers across), like the ring particles, is composed primarily of ice. The gap in the A ring through which Tethys is visible is the Keeler gap, which is kept clear by the small moon Daphnis (not visible here).

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

Reblogueado desde Voyage into Space
A PHOTO

distant-traveller:

Rosetta mission selfie at 16 km

Using the CIVA camera on Rosetta’s Philae lander, the spacecraft have snapped a ‘selfie’ at comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko from a distance of about 16 km from the surface of the comet. The image was taken on 7 October and captures the side of the Rosetta spacecraft and one of Rosetta’s 14 m-long solar wings, with the comet in the background.

Two images with different exposure times were combined to bring out the faint details in this very high contrast situation. The comet’s active ‘neck’ region is clearly visible, with streams of dust and gas extending away from the surface.

Image credit & copyright: ESA/Rosetta/Philae/CIVA

Reblogueado desde Voyage into Space
A PHOTO
Reblogueado desde VÓMITO